Changing Course The Wartime Experiences Of A Member Of The Women's Royal Naval Service 1939-1945 Changing Course The Wartime Experiences Of A Member Of The Women's Royal Naval Service 1939-1945

Sean Murphy

The only single-source account of British collaborators in the Second World War, this is the fascinating story of a collection of misfits and renegades who came from all walks of life and different social backgrounds, but who all had one thing in common. During the Second World War they chose to reject their country and follow the path of treason through collaboration with the Axis powers.
Altogether, about 200 British citizens were under investigation for assisting their country's enemies. Drawing upon official security files at The National Archives, some only recently released, and the case studies of the individuals concerned, Sean Murphy uncovers the aims and motivations that drove them to betray their country, describes how they collaborated with the enemy and explores their respective fates at the end of the war.
The stories of some of the more notorious traitors like William Joyce (Lord Haw-Haw) and P.G. Wodehouse are already well known - and they are included here - but also covered are some of the lesser-known but equally treacherous individuals. For example, Duncan Scott-Ford, a Scottish merchant seaman, who sold information to the Germans about convoy movements; Theodore Schurch, born in London of Swiss parents, who joined the British Army but agreed to work for Italian intelligence; and Harold Cole, who infiltrated Allied escape lines in Europe and betrayed between 100 and 150 British and French agents to the Germans.

"I desire to place my services and my life at the disposal of the Reich, and eventually earn the honour of becoming a German citizen."
(William Craven writing to Adolf Hitler)

"The reason I worked for the Germans was for the money."
(Frances Eckersley)